Your IP Address is: 18.207.129.133

Welcome to ShowMyIP.com.ar

Feel free to browse the internet at school with ShowMyIp.com.ar to unblock websites like Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, TikTok, Youtube, WhatsApp, Messenger, QQ, Qzone, Snapchat and more!

IP Addressing

Internet Protocol (IP) addresses are unique numeric identifiers that are needed by every device that connects to the Internet. The are a shared common resource that must be managed carefully to ensure the continued growth and stability of the Internet. Most of the Internet is currently addressed with IP version 4 (IPv4) addresses. IPv6 addresses are also in use, but not yet to the same extent. IPv6 is a more recent protocol, offering a much larger address pool than IPv4. However, IPv6 is not intended as a direct replacement for IPv4. Rather, the two address protocols are able to be used together across the Internet.

Global Mass Surveillance - The Fourteen Eyes

The UKUSA Agreement is an agreement between the United Kingdom, United States, Australia, Canada, and New Zealand to cooperatively collect, analyze, and share intelligence. Members of this group, known as the Five Eyes, focus on gathering and analyzing intelligence from different parts of the world. While Five Eyes countries have agreed to not spy on each other as adversaries, leaks by Snowden have revealed that some Five Eyes members monitor each other’s citizens and share intelligence to avoid breaking domestic laws that prohibit them from spying on their own citizens. The Five Eyes alliance also cooperates with groups of third party countries to share intelligence (forming the Nine Eyes and Fourteen Eyes), however Five Eyes and third party countries can and do spy on each other.

Five Eyes

  1. Australia
  2. Canada
  3. New Zealand
  4. United Kingdom
  5. United States of America

Nine Eyes

  1. Denmark
  2. France
  3. Netherlands
  4. Norway

Fourteen Eyes

  1. Belgium
  2. Germany
  3. Italy
  4. Spain
  5. Sweden

Why is it not recommended to choose a US VPN/Privacy based service?

Services based in the United States are not recommended because of the country’s surveillance programs, use of National Security Letters (NSLs) and accompanying gag orders, which forbid the recipient from talking about the request. This combination allows the government to secretly forcecompanies to grant complete access to customer data and transform the service into a tool of mass surveillance.

An example of this is Lavabit – a discontinued secure email service created by Ladar Levison. The FBI requested Snowden’s records after finding out that he used the service. Since Lavabit did not keep logs and email content was stored encrypted, the FBI served a subpoena (with a gag order) for the service’s SSL keys. Having the SSL keys would allow them to access communications (both metadata and unencrypted content) in real time for all of Lavabit’s customers, not just Snowden's.

Ultimately, Levison turned over the SSL keys and shut down the service at the same time. The US government then threatened Levison with arrest, saying that shutting down the service was a violation of the court order.

Key disclosure law - Who is required to hand over the encryption keys to authorities?

Mandatory key disclosure laws require individuals to turn over encryption keys to law enforcement conducting a criminal investigation. How these laws are implemented (who may be legally compelled to assist) vary from nation to nation, but a warrant is generally required. Defenses against key disclosure laws include steganography and encrypting data in a way that provides plausible deniability.

Steganography involves hiding sensitive information (which may be encrypted) inside of ordinary data (for example, encrypting an image file and then hiding it in an audio file). With plausible deniability, data is encrypted in a way that prevents an adversary from being able to prove that the information they are after exists (for example, one password may decrypt benign data and another password, used on the same file, could decrypt sensitive data).

IP Tools

IP Address Lookup

The IP Address Lookup tool is designed to give you an idea of where your IP Address or the IP Address you lookup is located.

IP WHOIS Lookup

The IP WHOIS Lookup tool will provide you with the IP Address owners information.

Hostname Lookup

The Host Name Lookup tool looks up the Host Name of the IP Address you enter.

Server Headers Check

The server headers check tool returns include CharacterSet, Content-Type, Last-Modified, Server, StatusCode, Set-Cookie, and X-Powered-By.

Domain Blacklist Check

Check to see if your IP address or domain name is blacklisted.

Traceroute

A TraceRoute is used to identify how information travels from one computer to another.

User Agent Info

Displays your User Agent String and Screen Resolution.